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Cancer And Hispanic Americans

During her time in the Supreme Court, Sotomayor has worked tirelessly to be a voice for women and ethnic minorities in criminal justice reform. With more than 30 years on our screens, Maria Elena Salinas is the longest running female news anchor on U.S. television, and is the first Latina to receive a Lifetime Achievement Emmy.

News programs and news apps are designed to hook people into coming back for more. Bad news even it turns out to be wrong is a powerful hook that draws people back. Bad news increases the use of the apps and news program viewers which translates into more revenue for the bad news brokers.

Immigrants, including those who have lost jobs and those working in jobs that place them at heightened risk of COVID-19, should have equal access to relief provisions that could help them put food on the table, pay their rent, and meet their health care needs. Giving more income to families struggling to afford the basics can relieve the stress from lack of resources, which research links to lasting harm for children’s brain development and physical health.

Even with the Amazon contract, she will still executive produce the family sitcom of a reimagining of Norman Lear’s 1970s classic. In an industry that has yet to level the playing field regarding women’s roles behind the camera, Gloria Calderón Kellett, executive producer and showrunner, continues to break the infamous glass ceilings for Latina women in Hollywood. Most recently, she inked a three year deal with Amazon Studios that makes her the first female Latinx writer and creator to sign an eight-figure contract. Concise enough to be a reference guide, yet meaty enough I coudln’t put it down, Sylvia Mendoza’s choice of Latina women and the material she selects to highlight for each, make a compelling read. From Malinche to Selena, we learn who and what drove the lives, passions and successes of these amazing, but often overlooked women.

Being raised by a single mother with 6 brothers and sisters, with minimal relative support lived their lives jumping from house to house, due to financial hardship as her mother possessed limited educational skills and struggled to find employment or childcare. Vanessa knew what it felt like not to have a home, food, or a job and this gave her the strength to develop a passion to live by doing for others. Vanessa’s main focus has always been to help others, so she developed organizations aimed helping build people and leaders. Ms. Talbott has spoken on matters relating to family law and estate planning, as well as diversity in the legal profession. She volunteers her time to pro bono legal clinics, as well as nonprofit organizations whose mission is to support underrepresented individuals in legal and non-legal matters.

Through our family of 41 chapters, they provide career development, professional networking, and community building opportunities to their undergraduate members. If health care and support for Hispanic/Latina women with breast cancer is to improve, breast cancer awareness outreach needs to happen in communities where Hispanic/Latina women gather for meetings or social events, such as schools, houses of worship, and community centers. Materials need to be in Spanish and community educators, preferably survivors, ideally need to be an ethnic and cultural match to the women living in those communities. When it comes to a population of individuals, the group may have some common characteristics, but each individual woman, her family, and her health care team can have a unique set of issues that affect the medical and surgical treatment of her breast cancer. Providing access to a culturally appropriate community health worker during breast cancer screenings may impact elements of patient care and satisfaction among Hispanic/Latina women, Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers report in American Journal of Roentgenology.

The share of the bachelor’s degrees they earn in these three broad fields has increased rapidly since 1995. The share of bachelor’s degrees Hispanic women earn in engineering is low, but it nearly doubled in the same period. Their share in computer sciences has remained flat at about 2% over the past 20 years. We would like to thank LIFT members and staff for sharing their experiences with us.

The Wage Gap For Latina Workers Is Still 54 Cents That’S Troubling.

One reason is that Hispanic women are more likely than others to be employed in leisure and hospitality services; some 14% of Hispanic women were in 2018 compared with 10% of women and 8% of men overall. The leisure and hospitality sector shed 39% of its workforce from February to May, far more than any other sector. The employment of Hispanic women was essentially unchanged during the Great Recession. More women than men lost their jobs from February to May, 11.5 million vs. 9.0 million. In sharp contrast, men lost more than twice as many jobs as women in the Great Recession from 2007 to 2009, 5.5 million vs. 2.5 million.

In Los Angeles, LIFT serves mostly Latino families, 50 percent of whom do not have a legal right to work and nearly 50 percent of whom are monolingual-Spanish-speaking. About half of the LIFT families in New York City are English-language learners. About 90 percent of LIFT parents are female and nearly all are women of color; most have a high school education or less. They work when their home and family responsibilities allow, mostly in retail, hospitality, child care, home health care, and the gig economy and in jobs that generally offer low pay and changing and uncertain hours.

Culturally, many of us in heterosexual relationships haven’t let go of traditional practices. The opening of doors, letting women go first, and men walking on the outside of the sidewalk are all old-school practices in courtship. Studies show that Latina women actually get physically ill when they are emotionally concerned for a love one. I can’t seem to find the cases for it, but I learned this in a course at UCLA and I never forgot it because I was wide-eyed with this epiphany. Correlated to how hard we love and to our confidence, Latina women like to show the world how wonderful you are.

Also, 44% of Hispanic immigrants in the workforce are estimated to have been unauthorized in 2016, which also likely made them more vulnerable to job cuts. The trends in employment among Hispanic workers are echoed in a Pew Research Center survey conducted April 29-May 5 in which Hispanic adults were more likely than American adults overall to say they have taken a pay cut or lost their job because of the coronavirus outbreak. Employment among immigrant workers has decreased more sharply than among U.S.-born workers in the COVID-19 recession, a 19% drop compared with 12%.

This organization acknowledges and aims to solve the issue of fear of deportation that plagues the Latina community and makes it fearful of reporting such crimes. The American Immigrant Council’s research states that in 2012 Latina immigrants from Mexico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic had the lowest education level when compared to other countries. However, women had higher education rates than the Latino male immigrants, as shown in the American Immigration Council’s chart. For example, 6.2% of female immigrants in Mexico have bachelor’s degrees as compared to the 5.0% of male immigrants in 2012. 14% of the women immigrants from the Dominican Republic have bachelor’s degrees compared to the 12% of Dominican men.

As a result, Latinas endure a severely unequal migratory experience when compared to their male counterparts. Immigration to the United States offers new economic prospects for Latina women. While many Latina women work outside the home in their countries of origin, their efforts in the U.S. often yield more economic benefits.

Conversely, labor force participation can be strengthened by efforts to raise Latinas’ earnings in the labor market. “Identifying the disparity in virus exposure will ideally help lead to the discovery of what is causing these differences, including factors rooted in systemic racism, and inform public health measures aimed at preventing further infections,” Puopolo said.

Hispanic and Latino/a/x Heritage Month is observed every year from September 15 to October 15 — the start date is on or close to the independence anniversaries of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico and Chile. To celebrate this month, we are uplifting 20 Latina/x and Hispanic women leaders, artists and activists. Read on to learn about 20 women whose leadership, innovation and creativity have made and continue to make vast contributions to our history.

Dearwater SR, Coben JH, Campbell JC, Nah G, Glass N, McLoughlin E, et al. Prevalence of intimate partner abuse in women treated at community hospital emergency departments.

Dubbed the “Voice of Hispanic America” by The New York Times, Salinas has become a figurehead for the Latino community. A successful published https://www.bmxzolder.be/the-absolute-most-ignored-solution-for-mexican-girls/ poet in her native Puerto Rico, de Burgos struggled to get the recognition she deserved after moving to the U.S. in the 1930s.

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